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Songs With Meaning To Me With Political Overtones





Woodie Guthrie ~ Bob Dylan


It Seems Appropriate To Start With New Beginning
The Rape Of The World   Heaven`s Here On earth   Smoke and Ashes   Cold Feet


Hazel Dickens / The Rebel Girl written by Joe Hill



More Coming
OK, so I was tripped out
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"Crazy Chester" was an eccentric resident of Fayetteville, Arkansas, who carried a cap gun. Ronnie Hawkins would tell him to "keep the peace" at his Rockwood Club when Chester arrived. The Band played there. Crazy Chester is mentioned in the song The Weight
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Barry McGuire - Eve of Destruction
Although this song is mostly associated with McGuire, it was actually written by P. F. Sloan.
His most successful songs as a writer were three top ten hits. Barry McGuire's 1965 "Eve of Destruction", Johnny Rivers' 1966 "Secret Agent Man" and Herman's Hermits' 1966 "A Must to Avoid".
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Buffalo Springfield - For what it's worth 1966
Written by Stephen Stills. Although "For What It's Worth" is often mistaken as an anti-war song, Stephen Stills was inspired to write the track because of the Sunset Strip curfew riots in November 1966.
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Paint it Black written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards in 1966
It was originally released as "Paint It, Black", the comma being an error by Decca Records, but, nonetheless, stirred controversy among fans over its racial interpretation.
It was their first song that featured a sitar instrumental included by Brian Jones not long after a discussion with George Harrison, who had recently recorded sitar in "Norwegian Wood".
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Fortunate Son Creedence Clearwater Revival 1969
he song's author and singer, John Fogerty, told Rolling Stone:
Julie Nixon was hanging around with David Eisenhower, and you just had the feeling that none of these people were going to be involved with the war. In 1968, the majority of the country thought morale was great among the troops, and eighty percent of them were in favor of the war. But to some of us who were watching closely, we just knew we were headed for trouble.
Fogerty has since gone on to explain more about the initial origin of the song, while on the television show The Voice:
The thoughts behind this song - it was a lot of anger. So it was the Vietnam War going on... Now I was drafted and they're making me fight, and no one has actually defined why. So this was all boiling inside of me and I sat down on the edge of my bed and out came "It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no senator's son!" You know, it took about 20 minutes to write the song.
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House of the Rising Sun Eric Burdon and the Animals
"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes called "Rising Sun Blues". It tells of a life gone wrong in New Orleans, urging a sibling to avoid the same fate.
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War - Edwin Starr
Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong wrote this song. They were well know songwriters for Motown in the 60's.
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Jefferson Airplane - Volunteers
Written by Jefferson Airplane guitarist Paul Kantner and vocalist Marty Balin, this song is a call to take a stand against the US government and the war in Vietnam. In a 1993 interview with Relix, Balin explained: "It became political but it didn't start out that way. I had woken up to the sound of garbage cans crashing outside the mansion and looked out, and there was this Volunteers of America truck, so I wrote that down and gave it to Paul and he wrote the song. Bang. People put all kinds of meaning into it."
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Creedence Clearwater Revival Run Through The Jungle
The song's title and lyrics, as well as the year it was released (1970), have led many to assume that the song is about the Vietnam War.
The fact that previous Creedence Clearwater Revival songs such as "Fortunate Son" were protests of the Vietnam War added to this belief.
However, in a 2016 interview, Fogerty explained that the song is actually about the proliferation of guns in the United States.
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Gimme Shelter - Rolling Stones Vietnam
Jagger said in a 1995 interview with Rolling Stone:"Well, it's a very rough, very violent era. The Vietnam War. Violence on the screens, pillage and burning. And Vietnam was not war as we knew it in the conventional sense. The thing about Vietnam was that it wasn't like World War II, and it wasn't like Korea, and it wasn't like the Gulf War. It was a real nasty war, and people didn't like it. People objected, and people didn't want to fight it..." As for the song itself, he concluded, "That's a kind of end-of-the-world song, really. It's apocalypse; the whole record's like that."
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"Ohio" by Crosby, Stills & Nash
Neil Young wrote the lyrics to "Ohio" after seeing the photos of the incident in Life Magazine.
Crosby once stated that Young keeping Nixon's name in the lyrics was "the bravest thing I ever heard." The American counterculture took the group as its own after this song, giving the four a status as leaders and spokesmen they would enjoy to varying extent for the rest of the decade.
It was banned from some AM radio stations because of the challenge to the Nixon Administration in the lyrics.
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"Here's to all the drat resistor, who will fight for sanity. When they march them off to prison in this land of liberty."
Draft Register Steppenwolf
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Country Joe & The Fish- Feel Like I'm Fixing To Die Rag
This song is a satire of US government attitudes toward the Vietnam War. Country Joe McDonald released it at the height of the war after he had been discharged from the US Navy for several years. He wrote it in about 30 minutes after it popped into his head.
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Richie Havens-Handsome Johnny
The song Handsome Johnny was written by Louis Gossett Jr. (yes, the actor) in 1966 and Richie Havens and was first released by Richie Havens in 1967.
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"Universal Soldier" is a song written and recorded by Canadian singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie in 1964.
It didn't become popular until it was recorded by Donovan in 1965.
Sainte-Marie said of the song: "I wrote 'Universal Soldier' in the basement of The Purple Onion coffee house in Toronto in the early sixties. It's about individual responsibility for war and how the old feudal thinking kills us all."
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Imagine by John Lennon
He wrote the song in 1971. Rolling Stone ranked "Imagine" number three on its list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time" Jimmy Carter said, "In many countries around the world—my wife and I have visited about 125 countries—you hear John Lennon's song 'Imagine' used almost equally with national anthems."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVg2EJvvlF8
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Where Have All the Flowers Gone? is a modern folk-style song. The melody and the first three verses were written by Pete Seeger in 1955 and published in Sing Out! magazine. Additional verses were added by Joe Hickerson in May 1960, who turned it into a circular song. Its rhetorical "where?" and meditation on death place the song in the ubi sunt tradition.
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I Ain't Marching Anymore
Written by Phil Ochs released in 1965.
Bonus: Phil Ochs Draft Dodger Rag
"If ya ever give a war without blood and gore I'll be the first to go."
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With God On Our Side 1964 by Bob Dylan
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The Cruel War (Peter, Paul & Mary)
Written by Peter YarrowNoel Stookey released in 1962
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John Denver: Last Night I Had The Strangest Dream (1971) Washington anti war protest
Although this song was famous at the time it was actually written by Ed McCurdy, merican folk singer, songwriter, and television actor, in 1950.
"Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream", has been recorded in seventy-six languages (including covers by The Weavers in 1960, the Chad Mitchell Trio in 1962, Simon & Garfunkel in 1964, Cornelis Vreeswijk in 1964 (in Swedish), Hannes Wader in 1979 (in German), Johnny Cash in 2002, Garth Brooks in 2005, Serena Ryder in 2006, and Charles Lloyd in 2016). The melody is included in Francesco de Gregori's "Via della poverta." In November 1989, as Tom Brokaw stood on top of the Berlin Wall, he directed his NBC-TV cameras towards the school children on the East German side of the Berlin Wall, to show the children singing "Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream" en masse as the wall was being dismantled.
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The War Drags On by Donovan
Although he made this song well known it was actually write by Michael 'Mick' Softley a British singer/songwriter and guitarist.
Due to contractual issues he never received any royalties in the later years for his songs.
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John Lennon - I Don't Want To Be A Soldier Mama 1971
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Judy Collins – Crow On The Cradle
This song was written by Sydney Carter an English poet, songwriter, folk musician, born in Camden Town, London.
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Zager And Evans - In The Year 2525 1969 (Vietnam Version) was originally written in 1964
I Love this Metropolis Version

The song warned of the dangers of technology, portraying a future in which the human race was destroyed by its own technological and medical innovations. The last stanza of the song suggests mankind undergoes a continuing cycle of birth, death and rebirth.
And there is this more modern version by Jane Rossie who I can not find any information on.
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Buffy Sainte-Marie - Universal Soldier
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Bob Dylan- With God on Our Side (1964)
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Bruce Cockburn - If I Had A Rocket Launcher
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James Blunt - No Bravery
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Jackson Browne: "Lives In the Balance"
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Armageddon Days Are Here (Again) By The The
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Asylum Street Spankers - "Stick Magnetic Ribbons on Your SUV"
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